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Courtesy of USA Today

Courtesy of USA Today

I’m pissed that I am actually talking about this topic four years later. People– specifically black people are still hating on Gabby Douglas and her hair.

This reminds me of the people who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones adage. I’d like to meet the person on this planet that is perfect. Oh yeah, news flash haters:  No one is perfect. Quite frankly, this strange focus on Gabby’s hair has less to do with perfection and more to do with a need from some people to feel better about themselves by spewing venom at others.

We spoke about the unfair criticism of Gabby’s hair in a podcast back in 2012:

NHCN Podcast 002: The Hair Controversy – Gabby Douglas and Oprah Winfrey

How has it become so easy to be so disrespectful towards another human being? When did our appearance become ultimately more important than who we are on the inside or more significant than our accomplishments? What is it that is inside humans that makes it okay to malign and trash people from our imaginary high horses? Don’t we get enough of that from people that hate us just because of the color of our skin to understand how wrong it is to denigrate and vilify our own; or anyone for that matter? Yes, others are vilifying her, but why are black people standing proud and loud behind the anonymity of our laptops to dance in the dirt with them?

WHY SHOULD WE BE FOCUSED ON HER HAIR?!? What we should be doing is praising Gabby for her accomplishments. She is talented and she represents the best that our country as to offer in the sport. And before anyone says ‘it’s because she is representing black people’ blah, blah, blah, she is black but no – she is not representing all black people. It’s like saying that all of the white Olympians are representing white people. Or that Asian Americans are representing Asians. Gabby, along with all of the Olympians regardless of color are representing their country.  She just happens to be black.

Think about it. We are quick to get pissed off when haters choose to judge all black people in a negative way, yet we feel free to judge a young woman who has sweated her hair out performing her olympic best in front of the cameras for something that ‘we’ all know happens to our hair?

Please… let’s stop all of the maligning and vilifying of each other and take a moment to praise and be proud of Gabby’s accomplishments.

Author: Dianne

Comment on this articleChanging attitudes about natural hair” is what we do at Natural Haircare News. Through informative articles, podcasts and videos, we go beyond just sharing the latest advice and tips on kinky, curly, wavy haircare – We shake things up and focus on the realities of wearing our hair natural. Not sure of which products are right for your hair type? Visit our solution oriented natural hair products store.

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2 Responses to Seriously…We Are Still Hating On Gabby Douglas’ Hair in 2016?

  1. Sandy says:

    Although I rarely get a response to my comments, I’ll leave this here: This shows me that the self hatred for ourselves is still deep, even after years of exploring our history and learning about our hair. This self esteem issue goes back decades. What will it take to move us from self hate as expressed through our hair issues? What will it take for us to show respect for our fellow sisters and brothers?

    • Pamela says:

      Thank you Sandy for your response. Unfortunately, even with all we know, and how far we’ve come in some areas, we still have so much work to do as black people. If anybody’s out there listening… Let’s please start investing more in our minds, bodies and spirits and less with fleeting material things. Let’s focus on what we and others DO have going on as opposed to (what is perceived) we don’t.

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